Texas Business Organizations Code
Sec. § 11.306
Stay of Judgment


(a)

If, in an action brought under this subchapter, a filing entity has proved by a preponderance of the evidence and obtained a finding that the problems for which the filing entity has been found guilty were not wilful or the result of a failure to take reasonable precautions, the entity may make a sworn application to the court for a stay of entry of the judgment to allow the filing entity a reasonable opportunity to cure the problems for which it has been found guilty. An application made under this subsection must be made not later than the fifth day after the date the court makes its findings under Section 11.305.

(b)

After a filing entity has made an application under Subsection (a), a court shall stay the entry of the judgment if the court is reasonably satisfied after considering the application and evidence offered with respect to the application that the filing entity:

(1)

is able and intends in good faith to cure the problems for which it has been found guilty; and

(2)

has not applied for the stay without just cause.

(c)

A court shall stay an entry of judgment under Subsection (b) for the period the court determines is reasonably necessary to afford the filing entity the opportunity to cure its problems if the entity acts with reasonable diligence. The court may not stay the entry of the judgment for longer than 60 days after the date the courts findings are made.

(d)

The court shall dismiss an action against a filing entity that, during the period the action is stayed by the court under this section, cures the problems for which winding up and termination is sought and pays all costs accrued in the action.

(e)

If a court finds that a filing entity has not cured the problems for which winding up and termination is sought within the period prescribed by Subsection (c), the court shall enter final judgment requiring a winding up of the filing entitys business.
Acts 2003, 78th Leg., ch. 182, Sec. 1, eff. Jan. 1, 2006.
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Oct. 20, 2019